Charles Dickens

Garden Court - the Chambers open for Open House

Open House London has locked up for another year. After a 2012 of suffering bewildering ballots and a wobbly website, the hard-working OH devotees have gone back to basics in 2013 and have queued, or in the case of some at Battersea Power Station have valiantly sought the end of the queue before giving up.

Amongst the gems on display was a building  that combines Grade 1 listed architecture, the home of a British Prime Minister, and the fictional home of one of Charles Dickens’ darkest characters.

Roman Remains - London & Verona

In London we are proud of our Roman remains. Despite their being revealed at street level largely through the vicissitudes of World War II, they mark something of Londinium life from c.50AD to c.410AD.

Charles Dickens, Mayfair and Little America

From the evidence of his writings, Charles Dickens did not like Mayfair. More precisely, he did not like what, socially, it represented. Given that Dickens was prone to write more about what he disapproved of in life, than about what he approved of (no doubt that approach made business sense) it is no shock that Mayfair, when picked on, got the great man’s treatment.

Charles Dickens' Lawyer

We are barely past the 200th anniversary of Charles Dickens’ birth, and already the writers on Dickens are jostling to identify that new angle, and those with a meaty work coming out during 2012 are wondering if the nation will be exhausted, or overtaken by the Olympics, by the time their baby is born.

From where might the new angle come? “Inside leg measurements of Charles Dickens and of his literary contemporaries”? A long-forgotten competitor to “Household Words”, containing a claim that “Charles Dickens ate my hamster”? (See The Sun of 13th April 1986).

The Aldwych Theatre - Haven't They Done Well?

To the Aldwych this last week for a performance of Midnight Tango, but immediately thinking of having gone to the RSC production years back, in the same venue, of The Life and Adventures of Nicholas Nickelby.

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